Bordeaux Almond Macaroons

  • Active Time 20m
  • Total Time 40m

Makes 2 dozen macaroons

The town of St.-Emilion in Bordeaux, France, is world famous for its great wines. Locally, however, it has an equal significant reputation for its magnificent macaroons. Macaroons are small, round pastries produced mostly from ground almonds, sugar and egg whites. There is no specific evidence as to when people first started baking macaroons, but by 1748 the kings of France were sending messengers to a particular convent because the nuns had become famous for their macaroons.

ingredients

  • 3 egg whites, room temperature
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 6 ounces blanched almonds, toasted and ground to a fine powder
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

directions

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.

Line 2 baking sheets with aluminum foil. In a mixing bowl, beat together the egg whites, salt and cream of tartar. Add the sugar a tablespoon at a time and continue beating until egg whites are glossy and form very stiff peaks. Gently fold in the ground almonds and flour. Drop tablespoons of batter about 1 inch apart on the prepared baking sheets.

Bake 15 to 20 minutes or until golden on the tips. Slide foil off baking sheets onto wire racks. Let stand 5 minutes. Gently peel foil away from backs of macaroons. Return macaroons to racks to cool.

The macaroons will store well in an airtight container at room temperature for 2 weeks; they will freeze well for about a month, not that I have ever seen anyone able to hold on to these tasty treats for more than 24 hours.

Recipe reprinted by permission of Doubleday. All rights reserved.

RecID 4004

nutrition information per serving

70 calories; 4g total fat; 0mg cholesterol; 20mg sodium; 8g carbohydrates; 0g fiber; 2g protein

These nutrition facts are calculated according to the ingredients listed in this recipe. Any substitutions will change these facts. Although we strive for accuracy, please note that food manufacturers occasionally change their food formulas, which could affect the calculations as shown.

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